Posts tagged tree

Lazy days of summer

The following is from Linn County Master Gardener Claire Smith:

 

LUV having the windows open!  LUV keeping the air conditioner off!  LUV sitting on the deck without bugs!  LUV having to mow the lawn only once a week!  It’s August.  Summer is winding down.  The cicadas are singing.  The robins are readying for their southern migration.  Soon we’ll experience the vibrant burst of burgundys and yellows and oranges.  School starts in a couple of weeks.  Are you ready for some football? 

            How are you going to tend your garden and yard for the rest of the lazy hazy days of August? 

Now is a great time to tour your yard looking for bare spaces or…….a good excuse to

  • create a new bed or add plants. How about peonies?  Choose a spot with sun and drainage.  Plant the “eye” (bud) about two inches deep.
  •  Or dig and divide your (or your neighbor’s—with their permission, of course) overgrown iris, poppies and other spring blooming perennials.  A good rule of thumb is to move spring blooming flowers in the fall and fall blooming flowers in the spring. 
  • Plant a tree!  Fall planting takes advantage of favorable soil temperatures and moisture conditions that promote the root growth needed to sustain plants through their critical first year in the landscape. 
  • It’s best not to prune now.  Pruning will stimulate unwanted late season growth.
  • Think fall flower arrangements.  Invest in a Burning Bush, a Bayberry Bush or a Red-twigged Dogwood.  All have colored stems that will stand out in dreary winter landscape. And those reddish branches create an outstanding compliment to fall groupings of gourds, pumpkins and dried flowers.
  • Mid-August through mid-September is the best time to repair, replace or start a new lawn.  Lawns with fifty percent or more weeds should be replaced.  Always purchase quality lawn seed.  All grass seed mixes should contain several varieties of bluegrass, fescue and rye grass.

So, get up off that couch.  Get out in the yard.  Enjoy this great time of the year.

 

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Oak Wilt Alert

The following is from Master Gardener Gene Frye about the revised “no prune” period for Iowa oak trees: 

  ISU Extension Foresters have just expanded the recommended “no-prune” period for Iowa oak trees to extend from March 1 through October 31 in order to minimize the chances of contracting the oak wilt disease.  The previous recommendation for not pruning was from mid-March through August.

 Oak wilt, a fungus disease, is fatal to all oaks in the red oak family within one year of the onset of the first symptoms, but white oaks may live for several years, and some even recover from the disease, but with substantial damage. 

 The main method of contracting oak wilt is through pruning or other wounds made during the growing season, with the resulting sap attracting certain insects carrying the oak wilt fungus on their bodies.  These insects bore into the wound carrying the fungus spores with them. 

 The other method of spreading oak wilt is through root grafts of nearby oaks of the same species.  Root grafts allow trees to exchange body fluids, so to speak.  Since the roots of most trees extend out to about the height of the tree, trees nearer than about one hundred feet of an infected tree of the same species can also acquire the disease.  Red oaks will not root graft with white oaks. 

If oaks must be pruned during the no-prune period, for example to manage storm damage, the pruning wounds should immediately be covered with a mixture of an outside white latex paint diluted one-to-one with water.  This is one of the few circumstances in which Extension Foresters recommend use of wound dressings.

 The first symptoms of oak wilt are a general drying and falling of leaves, usually during June or July.  In the case of red oaks, the whole tree is usually affected, but on white oaks, only individual branches show symptoms the first year of infection, followed the next years by more branches being affected.

  Positive diagnosis of oak wilt requires a laboratory test, but a reasonably reliable diagnosis can be made by finding longitudinal brown streaks just underneath the bark on affected branches.  Unfortunately, there are several other ailments that can appear to be oak wilt. Oak wilt usually appears in clumps, and is not nearly as devastating as chestnut blight or Dutch elm disease.  Infestations can usually be contained by application of good management practices. 

For more detailed information on oak wilt, see Extension publication SUL 15, “Oak Wilt—Identification and Management,” which is available at County Extension Offices for $1.00 or can be downloaded free of charge on the Internet at:  www.extension.iastate.edu/store  

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