Posts tagged traps

Japanese beetles are back

They’re back.

Japanese beetles

Japanese beetles

I spotted the first Japanese beetle of the season yesterday on my raspberry bushes. I went to check one of my rose bushes and sure enough, there was another one, sucking the life out of a beautiful pink bud. Unfortunately, both got away.

The beauty of these copper-colored beetles belies the devastation they wreak. Adult Japanese beetles feed on more than 300 types of plants – turning leaves into lacy skeletons. As larva, the white c-shaped grubs feed on turf grass roots.

I’ve heard some people have luck with the Japanese beetle traps that can be found at garden centers. Others say the traps just lure more beetles into your yard. When I see just a couple of the bugs, I use the squish method, but as they become more numerous, I’ll try to control their numbers with soapy water.

Take a small bucket with water and dish detergent – any kind will probably work – and knock the beetles off the plants into the bucket. The beetles are more active at certain times of day and will fly off. Othertimes, they do a drop and roll, which is the best way to get them to fall into the bucket. Early evening seems to be the time when they are more sluggish and easier to catch that way. Obviously, if you are growing crops that the beetles are attacking, such as grapes (another favorite,) you’re going to need a different method of control. They also favor certain trees, but supposedly they don’t kill the trees as do pests like the emerald ash borer. I also wonder what they will ultimately do to the monarch butterfly population, as Japanese beetles devastate the monarch’s food source, milkweed.

Since they make my top 10 bad bugs list, the Japanese beetle and different control methods can be found in several posts on this blog. Just use the search box at the right to find more from city arborist Daniel Gibbons, master gardeners and others on this foreign invader.

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Critters in the garden

Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith, wrote the following: The driver of the car at the stop light next to me looked rather aghast when I broke into a hearty laugh this morning.  I guess some radio and TV facts are just meant to be light hearted even though reported in a most serious manner, for example, the obnoxious little black flies that are so prevalent this spring are called buffalo gnats.  Do you know why?   Because they have a hump in their back.  With no disrespect intended to those folks who study insects, that “need-to-know” fact really struck my funny bone.

Not so funny is in the onslaught of beetles again this year.  Just a reminder, do not spray edible plants to rid the beetles.  Traps seem fairly effective.  The traps do attract the little critters in addition to killing them so it is suggested you locate traps at the ends of your property.

The ugly tunnels in your lawn are probably mole trails.  Another little known fact is that moles eat more than their own weight in worms daily.  Worms are good for the soil.  They constantly aerate the earth.  Keep the worms; eradicate the moles.  The most practical method of eviction is a scissor or harpoon type trap.  Locate the active tunnel by tamping down all of the tunnels.   Place the trap in the one the mole reopens. 

And then there are the garden invaders, the ground hogs, rabbits and raccoons.  Probably the best offense against them is a good fence. Hardware cloth or wire mesh should be at least 1½ to 2 ft. tall supported with wood or metal stakes.   Bury the fence into the ground a bit or secure it down with landscape pins.  Repellents are somewhat effective, but more costly as they need to be reapplied after each heavy rain. You could consider live traps, but the last time we tried live traps, an opossum was smarter than we were. We did capture two cats, though. 

And, finally, Oh! Deer!  It is best to discourage deer before they become accustomed to the delicacies in your garden or yard.  The most reliable deer prevention maintenance is a fence.  However, a deer proof fence will be at least eight feet tall which can be a costly venture, be aesthetically unattractive, and possible prohibited by local building codes.  Repellents and scare tactics are ineffective as deer ignore them.  Try temporary fences around new plants and special plants.  Deer may force you to choose plants that are less tasty to them, have an unusual texture, or a strong aroma.  Call your local extension office (in Linn County 447-0647) for a list of deer resistant plants.  Perhaps impractical in some cases, a good dog will be as efficient as anything else you might try.

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Centipedes, millipedes and more Japanese beetles

 

 

Master Gardener Intern, Sue Levasseur, answers two questions frequently asked of the Hortline:

 

            Q.  How can I get rid of those metallic-green bugs that are eating my plants?

The Japanese beetle has become a significant pest in Iowa during the past decade.  The head and thorax are shiny metallic-green, and the wing covers are coppery red. A row of five tufts of white hairs grow on each side of the abdomen.

            Japanese beetles are a double threat insect in the home garden.  In the larvae stage they are white C-shaped grubs that are approximately 1¼” long when fully mature.  They inhabit the soil from August until June where they feed on turf grass roots and organic matter.  Adult beetles emerge in June and eat the foliage and flowers of over 300 plants.  Foliage is consumed by eating the tissue between the veins, a type of feeding called skeletonizing.

            Control of adult beetles is difficult because they emerge every day for a period of several weeks.  Handpicking or screening of high-value plants may be of benefit in isolated situations with limited numbers of beetles.  Spot spraying infested foliage of high value plants with carbaryl (Sevin), permethrin (Eight) or cyfluthrin (Tempo) may reduce damage for several days but multiple applications are required to maintain control.  Spraying the adult stage is not an effective strategy for prevention of white grubs.  Use of floral lure and sex attractant traps is not recommended; research suggests that they are not effective in controlling moderate to heavy infestations and they may attract more beetles into a yard than would occur otherwise.  However, the traps may reduce damage and beetle populations where landscapes are isolated from other Japanese beetle breeding areas or when mass trapping (everyone in the neighborhood) is used.  

            Q.  What is the difference between centipedes and millipedes and how can I get rid of them in my house?

            House centipedes are approximately 1½” long with 15 pairs of long, threadlike legs extending from their body segments (one pair per segment). In contrast, millipedes are about 1¼” long and have 30 pairs of short legs extending from their body segments (two pair of legs per segment). 

            House centipedes are found both indoors and outdoors, but prefer living in damp portions of basements, bathrooms, and unexcavated areas under the house.  They feed on small insects, insect larvae and spiders.  Thus they are beneficial and considered harmless to people but most homeowners consider them a nuisance.

            To deter centipedes from your home dry up and clean the areas that serve as habitat and food source for centipedes as much as you can.  Residual insecticides can be applied to usual hiding places such as crawl spaces, dark corners in basements, baseboard cracks, openings in concrete slabs, under shelves and around stored boxes.

            Millipedes are usually found outdoors where they feed on decaying vegetable matter.  They are one of nature’s harmless “recyclers”.  Millipedes are accidental invaders in the house.  Capture and discard the offending invader.

Gardening Questions?  Call the Linn County Master Gardener Horticulture Line @ 319-447-0647.

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