Posts tagged potted

Eco-debate: real vs. fake

  Throw another log in the annual debate about which is better for the environment: an artificial tree or a real Christmas tree. Living Christmas trees are also an option in Iowa.

   Linn County Master Gardener Gene Frye has some experience in that arena. Frye’s wife was given a potted 2-foot-tall white spruce one year that they used for their Christmas tree.

   After the season, Frye kept the potted tree in his basement, keeping it semi-watered. Once the weather warms, the trees can be kept outdoors in their pots. More watering is necessary when they are outdoors.

   Frye said the tree was used for Christmas for a couple years until he planted it outside. Now the spruce is about 30 feet tall.

   If you want to keep the tree in its pot from year to year, Frye suggested bringing it indoors for the winter. Because conifers don’t go completely dormant, they could dehydrate if left outdoors in a small pot with frozen soil.

   Frye advocated finding a large spot to plant the tree when you are ready to transplant it. Early spring is the best time to transplant conifers in Iowa. For fall planting, late August through September is the best time to transplant conifers.

 

   Find more on the real vs. fake Christmas tree debate, as well as eco-friendly holiday tips in the Sunday, Dec. 14 issue of The Gazette.

 

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Perfect Poinsettias

The following is by Linn County Master Gardener Claire Smith:

 

My friend Ken used to say the only good poinsettia is a red poinsettia.    Did you know that:

o   Almost 75% of Americans still prefer red poinsettias over other colors.

o   Poinsettias were introduced into the U.S by Joel Poinsett, our first ambassador to Mexico, in 1825.

o   December 12th is National Poinsettia Day.

o   Ninety percent of all poinsettias are exported from the United States.

o   More than 60 million poinsettias, worth more than $200 million, are sold each holiday season.

o   Poinsettias are the most popular flowering potted plant, even though most are sold in a six-week period before Christmas.

o   The showy colored parts of the poinsettia are called bracts and are technically leaves.

o   Poinsettias are not poisonous.

How do you pick the perfect poinsettia? 

o   Healthy plants have a full complement of dark green leaves that are free of brown edges.

o   The bracts should be fully colored and not damaged. 

o   Check the true flowers in the center of the bracts.  They should be greenish-yellow and sometimes have pollen.

o   Wrap the plant carefully to carry it home to prevent injury from cold temperatures outdoors.

o   Place the plant in a bright, well-lit location, away from drafts.  Ideal temperatures are 60-70F daytime, 55-60F at night.  

o   Water thoroughly when the surface soil dries out, but pour excess water out of the saucer.  

o   Wait to fertilize until early spring.

So, enjoy the poinsettias in your favorite holiday color scheme as they are now also available in pink, white, peach, plum, yellow, cranberry, marbled, spotted and can even be dyed blue!

 

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