Posts tagged pot

Winter Gardening photos

What a great turnout at Saturday’s 2009 Winter Gardening Fair at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids. And such great speakers. The Linn County Master Gardeners put together a wonderful event, once again. This one drew about 525 people. Some of the photos I shot are below. I’ll post more in the coming days. If you have any information you learned at the event that you’d like to share, please add your comments. 

Beverley Suthers, Cedar Rapids, smells orchids at the Eastern Iowa Orchid Society table manned by Bill & Jean Snyder. Jon Lorence of Solon provided the orchids.

Beverley Suthers, Cedar Rapids, smells orchids at the Eastern Iowa Orchid Society table manned by Bill & Jean Snyder. Jon Lorence of Solon provided the orchids.

Raelene Parker, Marion, and mom Joyce Kenney, Vinton, enjoy lunch.

Raelene Parker, Marion, and mom Joyce Kenney, Vinton, enjoy lunch.

Barb Rickard, Tipton, and Nancy Jennings, Marion, sample the salsa.

Barb Rickard, Tipton, and Nancy Jennings, Marion, sample the salsa.

Keynote speaker Janet Macunovich converses with master gardeners.

Keynote speaker Janet Macunovich, right, converses with master gardeners.

Master Gardener Judy Bemer with "Lola" her herb pot.

Master Gardener Judy Bemer with "Lola" her herb pot.

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Eco-debate: real vs. fake

  Throw another log in the annual debate about which is better for the environment: an artificial tree or a real Christmas tree. Living Christmas trees are also an option in Iowa.

   Linn County Master Gardener Gene Frye has some experience in that arena. Frye’s wife was given a potted 2-foot-tall white spruce one year that they used for their Christmas tree.

   After the season, Frye kept the potted tree in his basement, keeping it semi-watered. Once the weather warms, the trees can be kept outdoors in their pots. More watering is necessary when they are outdoors.

   Frye said the tree was used for Christmas for a couple years until he planted it outside. Now the spruce is about 30 feet tall.

   If you want to keep the tree in its pot from year to year, Frye suggested bringing it indoors for the winter. Because conifers don’t go completely dormant, they could dehydrate if left outdoors in a small pot with frozen soil.

   Frye advocated finding a large spot to plant the tree when you are ready to transplant it. Early spring is the best time to transplant conifers in Iowa. For fall planting, late August through September is the best time to transplant conifers.

 

   Find more on the real vs. fake Christmas tree debate, as well as eco-friendly holiday tips in the Sunday, Dec. 14 issue of The Gazette.

 

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Keeping a pot in the house

   Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith, offered the following on keeping mum pots in the house and other fall advice for Iowans:

               

Feel free to ask questions:  Master Gardeners love to visit.  If a M.G. doesn’t have an answer, he/she will be eager to do the research for an answer as well as satisfy our own ongoing curiosity of all plants living—and sometimes dead.  Following are some common fall inquiries:

·         Most trees can be trimmed between December and February.   Hold off on fruit trees until late February.  Clean instruments between trees to prevent disease transfer.  Cut outside of the “collar”.  Maximum trimming should be 1/3 of the tree.

·         Grape Hyacinth may send up shoots now:  it should be o.k.

·         Saving Dahlias and Callas:  do not store in plastic bags as moisture will create mold.  Layer the bulbs, but don’t allow them to touch by putting vermiculate between them.  Cure the bulbs in a warm area for a few days then store at 45’ in the basement.   Do not allow the bulbs to freeze.

·         Oleander can be trimmed.  Cut ¼ off to main branch.

·         Clematis:  some of rabbit’s favorite food!  Try fencing with chicken wire.   No need to mulch.

·         Burning Bush:  can be trimmed any time, but recommend after leaf loss.  Vibrant color this year possibly due to excess spring moisture.

·         Spirea can be trimmed now.

·         Geraniums can be left potted in a sunny window for the winter.  Or, shake off the root dirt and hang upside down in a paper bag in the basement or unheated attic. Dip roots in water monthly.  In February, cut away dried area leaving nubbins.  Dip in Root Tone after potting to initiate growth.

·         Mums:  generally not winter hardy.  Root system won’t withstand Iowa’s freezing winter.   Can keep in pot in the house if cut back.  Plant in the spring on the south/sunny side of the house.

·         House Plants:  will probably have little new growth as they use spend energy adjusting to being moved inside.  

·         Routinely monitor animal management strategy.  In years of high animal population and limited food (think last winter!), they will eat almost anything.

·         Pest –free debris from fall clean up can be composted.

·         Do not fertilize now.  Improve the soil with the addition of shredded leaves, well-rotted manure, or other organic matter.

·         Drain garden hose and put away. 

·         Direct sunlight and freezing temperatures can diminish efficacy of liquid pesticides and fertilizers.

 

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