Posts tagged pollution

Spring tree care

The following is by Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith:

 

    March marked the start of our transition from winter to spring.  Now that the snow has melted  (we hope,)  it’s a good time to examine your trees for winter damage.  We often expect our trees to be self sufficient and  tend to neglect their well-being.  

     After the frost is gone, thoroughly water trees that have been subjected to de-icing compounds.  This will move the chemicals through the soil and away from the tree roots.   Watering before the ground thaws will create runoff and pollute soil and ground water. 

     If your trees need to be fertilized, wait until the ground has completely thawed.  Fertilizer run off wastes money and also contributes to groundwater pollution.

     If, and only if, an insect problem exists, dormant oil sprays can be used once the temperature reaches a constant 40 degrees.  Dormant oils are used to control some scale insects and overwintering insects. 

    Rabbits and voles girdle trunks at the base.  Damage will appear as a lighter area on the trunk, primarily as teeth marks.   The damage interrupts the flow of water and nutrients to the roots.   While you have no recourse for the damage, it is wise to monitor the health of the tree as severe damage can kill a tree.

    Tree wraps should be removed in the spring as the temperature warms.

    Complete pruning prior to trees leafing out.  Storm damaged branches should be removed as they occur. 

    If you’re planning on adding trees to your landscape, now is a good time to visit our local nurseries and greenhouses for suggestions and recommendations.        Personally, I’m going to find the shadiest spot under the big walnut to plant my chair and enjoy my favorite summer beverage.

 

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Cedar Rapids school not on EPA’s list for outdoor air pollution monitoring

   Johnson Elementary in Cedar Rapids was not included in a list the Environmental Protection Agency released today of schools that will be monitored for outdoor air pollution.

   The EPA, state and local agencies will work together to monitor air toxics around 62 schools in 22 states that are located near large industrial facilities or in urban areas. EPA identified the schools based on information – from a newspaper analysis – that raised questions about air quality.

   Roland-Story High School in Story City, north of Ames, was the only Iowa school included on the EPA monitoring list.

   Johnson Elementary ranked among schools nationwide with the worst outdoor air quality, according to a report in December by USA Today.

   Linn County Public Health officials disputed the report, and held a meeting in February at Johnson Elementary, 355 18th St. SE.

    Jim Hodina, supervisor of the air quality division at Linn County Public Health, discussed air quality issues with about 15 parents at the school.

 The USA Today report said the main chemical of concern was manganese, emitted from Cedarapids Inc. 909 17th St. NE.  The model used by USA Today suggested all of the manganese generated at the plant was released into the air.  Cedarapids Inc. generates dust in its plant from cutting metal, Hodina said, but not all of the dust leaves the building.

    For more information about Linn County Public Health’s response to the air quality report, go to: http://www.linncleanair.org

    Here is the EPA press release:

 (Washington, D.C. – March 31, 2009) In an unprecedented effort to help protect children from toxic air pollution around schools, EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson announced a list of schools that will undergo outdoor air monitoring.

“As a mother, I understand that concerned parents deserve this information as quickly as we can gather and analyze it,” said EPA Administrator Lisa P. Jackson. “EPA, state, and local officials are mobilizing to determine where elevated levels of toxics pose a threat, so that we can take swift action to protect our children at their schools.”

EPA, state and local agencies will work together to monitor air toxics around 62 schools in 22 states that are located near large industrial facilities or in urban areas. EPA identified these schools for monitoring based on information that raised questions about air quality. That information included the best data available to EPA scientists about air pollution in the vicinity of schools, results of a computer modeling analysis, results from a recent newspaper analysis, and information from state and local air agencies.

Depending on the availability of staff and equipment, monitoring at some schools on the list will begin almost immediately; other schools will begin monitoring over the next 60 to 90 days. State and local air agencies will install and operate the monitors, while EPA will purchase the monitors and pay for laboratory analysis.

State and local agencies will take periodic samples of the air around the schools for a 60-day period. EPA will analyze the results of the monitoring and share the information with the schools and the public. EPA will use the information gathered in this initiative to determine how best to move forward, which could require additional monitoring or enforcement action where appropriate.

EPA and states will work with school communities to ensure they understand the monitoring results. In addition to monitoring the outdoor air quality, EPA also will help interested schools improve the quality of their indoor air.

To learn more about this program and to view the list of schools that are part of the monitoring initiative: http://www.epa.gov/schoolair

 

 

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Rain gardens

Presented by:  Lucy Hershberger Forever Green Inc.

Sat. September 6th 10 am

Rain gardens are gardens designed with a purpose: they reduce runoff into our rivers and streams, which reduces pollution and flooding.  Participants will learn what a rain garden is, how it works, and how to determine the location, size and best plants to use in their rain garden. 

 

The near record rainfalls we had this year demonstrated the need to manage surface runoff  help reduce flash flooding and pollution in our rivers and streams.  Rainfall used to be absorbed into the ground as it fell. Now roads, parking areas and buildings channel water and the pollutants it carries into storm sewers that drain directly into streams and rivers.  Rain gardens can absorb most rainfalls and reduce these problems while enhancing the appearance of your yard. 

 

Lucy Hershberger, Forever Green Inc., will show you how you can plant a rain garden that will help reduce the runoff problem.  This hands-on seminar will offer participants an opportunity to see a rain garden under construction, learn what a rain garden is, how it works, and how to determine the location, size and best plants to use in their rain garden.

 

Location:  Forever Green Garden Center  

125 Forevergreen Rd. Coralville, Iowa

 

For information contact:

Lucy Hershberger Forever Green Inc.

319-626-6770 or e-mail forevergreen@southslope.net

This event is free to the public.

www.forevergreengrows.com

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