Posts tagged Kentucky bluegrass

Mowing tips

   The amount of rainfall we’ve received in Eastern Iowa this weekend alone has been incredible. For homeowners who like a green lawn, it’s a boon. Personally, I don’t mind letting my lawn go dormant to save on the weekly chore of mowing, but it doesn’t look like that will happen anytime soon.

 

   Richard Jauron, of Iowa State University’s Department of Horticulture, offers the following tips for those of us who will once again be getting the mowers out this week:

 

   Sound mowing practices are important during the summer months. Kentucky bluegrass lawns should be mowed at a height of 3 to 3.5 inches during the summer months. (During cool weather in spring and fall, bluegrass lawns should be mowed at a height of 2.5 to 3 inches.) The additional leaf area during summer shades and cools the crowns of the turfgrass plants. Extremely high temperatures at crown level can kill the turfgrass.

When mowing the lawn, never remove more than one-third of the total leaf area at any one time. Accordingly, a lawn being mowed at a height of 3 inches should be cut when it reaches a height of 4.5 inches. Removing more than one-third of the leaf area weakens the turfgrass and reduces its ability to withstand additional environmental stresses. Weakened turf is also more likely to be invaded by weeds.

If possible, mow in the cool of the morning or evening. Mowing at midday may place additional stress on the turf. Also, make sure the mower blade is sharp. Dull blades tear and bruise the leaf tips.

Dormant lawns (those that have turned brown) should not be mowed. Pedestrian and mower traffic could damage the turf.
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

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Home lawn care

      The following is from Master Gardener Claire Smith: 

 Remember a few years ago when the TV helicopter pilot upon seeing a tornado shouted, “I see it!  I see it!”?  That’s how I felt today when I finally saw my lawn.  While all of the snow did provide a great deal of insulation and protection for our plants, I’m so glad it has finally melted.  Robins are searching for worms and squirrels are scavenging for any unburied nuts. And, on St. Patrick’s Day, I did see a bit-o-the-green peeking through.

     Oh! How I want to get to work on the lawn right now.  My goal this year is a strong turfgrass stand.  An ISU bulletin titled Home Lawn Care:  Weed Control indicates that weeds in a lawn are often a sign of a thin turfgrass stand.  (FYI, Turfgrass is defined as a spreading or stoloniferous [a horizontal branch from the base of a plant that produces new plants from buds at its tip, called a runner] grass as opposed to a tufted grass.)  Maintaining a dense turfgrass stand prevents weed infestations so: 

  • Choose the correct species of turfgrass. Kentucky bluegrass grows best in full sun.  A mixture containing fine fescues is suitable for shady areas.
  • Routine mowing will eliminate weeds with an upright growth habit.
  • Mow at a 3-3 ½” height
  • Inadequate or too frequent irrigation damages turfgrass
  • Identify weeds to determine method of removal.  A visit with your weed sample in hand to your Extension Office (in Marion at 3279 7th Ave. Ste 140, in the professional building in the strip mall next to the farm store) will provide not only an identification of the plant, but a suggested eradication plan as well.

          Weeds can be mechanically removed by pulling or digging. Chemical weed control may be your choice using an application of pre and/or postemergence herbicides.  Most herbicides selectively kill certain weeds.  A second application 7-10 days later may be necessary.  Apply preemergence herbicides in Southern Iowa around April 10th and around May 15th in the North.  A guide for crabgrass control is application of the chemical by the time the forsythia blossoms begin to drop or when the redbud trees are in full bloom. Optimum control of broadleaf weeds occurs when postemergence products are applied during the plants’ early bloom stage.  2-4-D and DSMA will control certain weeds without injuring the turf grass. Early spring applications are safer as some products vaporize and drift under high temperatures and humidity potentially damaging flowers and shrubs.       Apply when air is calm and rain is not expected for 24 hours.Use proper caution when mixing or handling any pesticide.  Most products available consist of a prepackaged mixture of two to three chemicals.  I’m off to pick up branches that are no longer frozen to the ground and watch the critters that are enjoying the advent of nicer weather as much as I am.  Happy Spring!! 

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