Posts tagged Janet Macunovich

Home and Garden Show and much, much more

The following is from Claire Smith, Linn County Master Gardener:

 

The 2009 Winter Gardening Fair – what an event!  The new Kirkwood Center for Continuing Education is a phenomenal building—one floor, great traffic patterns and lots of light.  A two-track program offered something of interest to everyone with the slightest interest in all things flora.  High energy keynote speaker Janet Macunovich used her photographer husband, Steve Nikkila’s talents to the max to delight all with “Continuous Color in the Landscape”.  

Bummed that you didn’t attend?  Let us share with you multiple other educational opportunities.  Linn County Master Gardeners will be presenting several FREE educational opportunities at the Hiawatha Public Library.  Classes include Pruning Trees and Shrubs, February 18th; Houseplants, February 25th; Starting Garden Transplants, April 1st; Garden Lighting, April 8th; Revitalizing Your Garden, April 15th; Container Gardens, April 22nd; and Lawns Green with Envy April 29.  All classes commence at 6:00 p.m. 

The WMT Garden and Home Show is March 14th & 15th at Hawkeye Downs.  Master Gardeners will be available throughout the show to answer questions and offer suggestions. 

Another highlight is the Creative Gardening Series.  The evening programs are FREE sponsored by the Master Gardeners.  Dates are March 31st, April 7th and 14th.    A hands-on program on April 18th, with different options available is offered, also.  The hands on classes will have a fee.   Additional information will be available on this blog soon.

  Several hundred plants will be for sale at our annual Plant Sale on May 16th at the Linn County Extension Office, 3279 7th Ave. in Marion.  These are plants from Master Gardeners’ personal gardens.

Master Gardeners will be available to offer information about growing conditions and locations.

Mark your calendar for the Master Gardener’s Garden Walk on June 13th.  This is a wonderful opportunity to visit five gardens, each unique in its own right. You’re encouraged to ask lots and lots of questions and glean ideas from each flower bed, pond, and landscape.

Linn County Master Gardeners provide a cooperative venture with the Linn County Fair from July 8th-13th.  On August 22nd, Master Gardeners will participate in the Garden and Art Show at Brucemore.  

Feel free to call the Horticulture Hort Line at 319-447-0647 for additional information on any of these opportunities.  And call the Horticulture Hort Line to hear research based answers to any plant questions you have.

 

 

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Winter Gardening photos

What a great turnout at Saturday’s 2009 Winter Gardening Fair at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids. And such great speakers. The Linn County Master Gardeners put together a wonderful event, once again. This one drew about 525 people. Some of the photos I shot are below. I’ll post more in the coming days. If you have any information you learned at the event that you’d like to share, please add your comments. 

Beverley Suthers, Cedar Rapids, smells orchids at the Eastern Iowa Orchid Society table manned by Bill & Jean Snyder. Jon Lorence of Solon provided the orchids.

Beverley Suthers, Cedar Rapids, smells orchids at the Eastern Iowa Orchid Society table manned by Bill & Jean Snyder. Jon Lorence of Solon provided the orchids.

Raelene Parker, Marion, and mom Joyce Kenney, Vinton, enjoy lunch.

Raelene Parker, Marion, and mom Joyce Kenney, Vinton, enjoy lunch.

Barb Rickard, Tipton, and Nancy Jennings, Marion, sample the salsa.

Barb Rickard, Tipton, and Nancy Jennings, Marion, sample the salsa.

Keynote speaker Janet Macunovich converses with master gardeners.

Keynote speaker Janet Macunovich, right, converses with master gardeners.

Master Gardener Judy Bemer with "Lola" her herb pot.

Master Gardener Judy Bemer with "Lola" her herb pot.

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Flood advice

Landscape designer and author Janet Macunovich, who will be keynote speaker at the upcoming Winter Gardening Fair at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, wrote this advice in 2005 after she and her husband, garden photographer Steve Nikkila,  experienced flooding at their home in Michigan.  Janet passed this along as advice for Iowans who were flooded last year.  She writes: “Although it’s been a year since Cedar Rapids’ devastating flood, I am sure what’s in it is still applicable, as gardens can’t be the first thing we think about after such a disaster, and they take time.”


Special to those with flooded gardens.
I’m thinking this week about gardeners in the path of Hurricane Katrina who were fortunate enough to be spared flooding within their homes, or who cleaned up from minimal interior damage only to find that their yards were not similarly spared.

Three times in the last five years, my own yard has been under 18 inches to several feet of water that poured in from uphill areas when over-taxed storm drains failed. Luck the first time, and then fast sandbagging during subsequent floods, kept the water in our slab home to under a foot. Yet all the relief I felt after removing the interior mud disappeared when I realized how much debris, piled soil, displaced mulch and gullies had been deposited, plowed and cut by the force of so much water moving through my garden.

So my heart goes out to you who are recovering from flood or trying to help one of those gardeners reclaim their beds. I hope when you conquer the despair and the anger and start the reclamation that some of the following notes may make your work easier.

Use the triage approach of doctors working in disaster situations. Spend the time you have on the most important and permanent plants in your yard, even if it means losing some others. Rinse off evergreens so their needles and leaves can return to full photosynthetic power. Then they can produce enough energy to make internal repairs or grow roots to replace those lost to drowning. Pull soil away from the trunks of trees and shrubs. Banked soil traps moisture against the bark and can incite rot the plant will be unable to repair. Cut back water-battered shrubs, even if this means removing major limbs. Chances are such a plant will grow back much more quickly than you imagine but even if it revives slowly it will be at a better pace and to a better end than if you left it alone. That’s because a few clean cuts take less energy to seal over than dozens or hundreds of breaks.

If a large tree has shifted and is leaning, do not try to brace or straighten it. Call in an arborist and be prepared to hear you have to remove it. Submerged soil floats, removing the weight that was anchoring the tree’s surprisingly shallow pan of roots. Many trees topple in a hurricane not from wind but when water renders weightless the anchor that was counterbalancing the tree’s top. A tree that doesn’t fall but only leans may remain in that position once the water departs but it will never be as stable as it once was, and may be a serious hazard in the next storm. Nothing you can do to the trunk will change that.

Don’t scoop up and reuse mulch that floated and piled up wherever the water slowed in its path. That mulch is no longer an asset in weed control but a liability, since it is full of weed seeds that came with the water. Instead, gather and pile that mulch high enough (three feet or more) to make a hot compost. The heat of active composting will kill weed seeds.

Right now and for the next couple of seasons, be extra vigilant about applying and maintaining a mulch layer. Mulch over the mulch you already have, even if you would have waited until next spring to renew it. If you normally go without mulch during the growing season, it will be better to make a temporary change. Over years, your attention to your garden had reduced the number of weed seeds in the top layer of the soil, so weeding had become less of a chore. The flooded garden, however, has been loaded with seeds from other places. Some may be weed species brand new to your experience. Be ready for them — suppress them before they can start.

Don’t hesitate – cut down all herbaceous plants that were battered. It will simplify removing debris and shifting flood-piled soil. The cutback is unlikely to kill them when it comes this late in the season.

Before you start digging and raking, determine just how much soil was deposited over your perennials. Most can emerge successfully through about an inch of extra soil. Bulb plants can manage even when buried 3 or 4 inches deeper than before. Where a heavier layer of soil covered an area, consider keeping it as a raised bed. Dig up a few perennials, divide them and replant the area with those starts at the new level.

Resist the urge to use collected debris to fill gullies that were gouged by fast moving water. Where the water moved fast enough to scour and cut this time, it will move quickly if it comes again. Such areas need to be filled and tamped down using uniform, dense material such as sand and gravel that will make a smooth, heavy, low-friction surface. Water will slide past. In contrast, junk makes a loose fill that presents a myriad of edges to rushing water. That water will pluck things loose, quickly making depressions that will then become a new wash-out.

Include damage to paved surfaces in your damage report to FEMA. You may find some help in resurfacing not just the driveway, but walks or patios that crumbled and washed away when their bases flushed away.

Expect your reclamation to take years. Higher expectations can sap your soul. Accept that some things will die or need replacement, even though they survived the flood itself. Try to think in terms of opportunity to try new things, rather than dwelling on the losses.

Give yourself a view that will fuel your heart rather than your depression. Start your clean-up in an area close to your window or door, even if this makes no logistical sense. A sitting area is ideal. Bring that space back up to your old standard, even if that means letting chaos reign elsewhere a little longer. Each time you see that spot or sit with some comfort in it, you’ll feel better, and be better able to keep moving outward from that refuge.

 

Janet publishes a free weekly gardening newsletter based on questions people ask. She offered to answer anyone from this area who might want to know more after reading her flooded-garden advice.
You can reach Janet by email at:
JMaxGarden@aol.com

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Spring explosion

Landscape designer and author Janet Macunovich and her husband, photographer Steve Nikkila, will be keynote speaker and featured speaker at the Winter Gardening Fair on Feb. 7, 2009, at Kirkwood Community College in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. Linn County Master Gardener Becki Lynch has provided information on the event, which can be found by clicking on the Master Gardeners category on this blog. More will also be printed in the Sunday, Feb. 1 edition of The Gazette. I had the chance to talk to the couple by phone last week. To hear excerpts of that interview, click on the links below:

 

Janet Macunovich

Janet Macunovich

 

 

 

 

http://www.gazetteonline.com/assets/mp3/cindy2.mp3

Steve Nikkila

Steve Nikkila

http://www.gazetteonline.com/assets/mp3/cindy1.mp3

Photos are courtesy of Steve Nikkila

 

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Winter Gardening Fair

Linn County Master Gardener, Becki Lynch, shares the following about the Winter Gardening Fair:

 

Hard to believe we’re already into 2009!  I don’t know about you, but the years seem to be spinning along even faster as I get older – and now we’re almost to February 7, 2009, the day of the Winter Gardening Fair, 2009.

 

As you may already know, the Iowa State University Extension Linn County Master Gardeners sponsor this day of gardening seminars each year, partnering with Kirkwood Community College. 

 

This year we’re offering a full day of four seminars, as well as a keynote presentation for $49.  Lunch is also included.  Simply call our Hortline number (319) 447-0647 to request a brochure, or go to our web site www.extension.iastate.edu/linn to see the full array of seminars and details to register.

 

We’re particularly pleased and looking forward to our keynote and featured speakers, Janet Macunovich and Steven Nikkila.  They are a husband and wife team that are both knowledgeable and entertaining speakers.  Janet will be speaking on how to provide continuous color in your landscape through all four seasons.  She is a true Midwesterner and provides very practical and down-to-earth instructions and tips – at the same time, she is a joy to listen to.  I know she’ll get you excited to start your gardening season with lots of new ideas.

 

Steven is a wonderful photographer, who is also a delight to listen to about ways to improve those garden photographs that are so helpful in recording and planning your garden landscape.  He speaks to all of us amateurs with our digital cameras, as well as those more “professional level” folks.  I’m looking forward to being able to ask some of those questions I have about light and framing.  Why do I always seem to cut off the heads of my most beautiful flowers?  And why isn’t the color the same in the photograph as what I see?

 

I’m sure you’ll enjoy our speakers this year, and I hope to see you at the fair this year.  Next week, we’ll have more on  some of the wonderful local speakers who will be presenting workshops at the fair.  

 

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Hortline education

 

The following is by Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith:

 

  I’m having my first experience today as a scribe for the Master Gardener, answering questions for our Horticulture Hotline.  We received a plethora of questions, for example, “Can I still spray for weeds now?”  and “Explain what my soil test results mean and “How do I get grass to grow under my Linden tree?”  What an intriguing and educational two hours it was!  From 10:00 to Noon Monday through Friday (winter hours/hours extended to morning and afternoon in the summer) you can speak personally with a Master Gardener at the Extension Office or call the Hort. Line at 319-447-0647, visit about any gardening question and hear a research based answer. 

Now that we‘ve had a good hard frost, we’re going back to Central Standard Time and the lawn mower is stashed away, what are you going to do?  Well, I just bought my 2009 planner and my first notation is jotting down the date of the Master Gardeners’ Winter Gardening Fair scheduled for Saturday, February 7, 2009 at the beautiful new Kirkwood Center for Continuing Education.  You and your friends and family can spend the day at gardening classes of your choosing plus listen to an outstanding keynote address by landscape designer and author Janet Macunovich presenting Continuous Color in the Landscape.  Your registration fee includes your session classes, Janet’s energetic and practical presentation AND lunch!  More information will be available in December with the registration deadline in January.  Plan to attend!

The Iowa State University Extension 2009 Garden Calendar is available.  This large calendar provides eight timely gardening hints each month in addition to wonderful pictures.   It’s available for a nominal fee at the Linn County Extension Office at 3279 7th Ave. in Marion.  

A Master Gardener offered up a great organizational hint today and one my grandkids could be involved in:  she’s putting up a peg board in her garage and hanging up all of the tools. (This is where the kids come in), she (or the kids) will draw around each tool with paint so she will know where each tool should be and which ones weren’t put away properly.  Can you imagine how Catie and Charlie could be all over Daddy about keeping the garage neat and orderly? 

 

 

 

 

 

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