Posts tagged flooded

Deconstruction vs. demolition: a green way to handle flooded homes?

Michael Richards, president of the Oakhill/Jackson Neighborhood Association, has been working on a “Good Jobs/Green Garages” effort since the floods. Some of that is detailed in an article in the Sunday, March 8, 2009, issue of the Gazette:

 

http://tinyurl.com/bdn94m

 

Here is more from Michael about those efforts:

 

   “We have added a very important layer of innovation and action to Good Jobs/Green Garages:

   As Neighborhood Assn. President, I have been approached by flooded residents in their 70s and 80s that do not have the time, energy or financing to Rehab/Rebuild.   We are pairing these elderly residents with former Metro High students that are now in their mid twenties, energetic, employed and ready to engage limited money with “sweat equity” to gain first time home ownership by rehab and retrofit of these flooded homes they are purchasing from the above noted elderly flood victims.  We have one rehab/retrofit  Next Generation Home Ownership project already underway in Oakhill Jackson.   We have also paired an elderly resident/ and a young new homeowner in Time Check to work with  this model of community recovery.

   My goal is this:  Create the working model. Then, if the City Government wants to get on board, fine, if not, well, we’ll keep working away to rebuild this city one step at a time from the ground up.”

 

 

   From Cindy, again: Rod Scott, who is also featured in the Gazette article, realizes not every flooded home can be saved. But he questions why so many that could be rebuilt are being torn down. He asks if it’s because the city is encouraging demolition, especially of homes in modest-income neighborhoods. Rod, who is president of the Iowa Historic Preservation Alliance, notes that many of the homes are structurally sound. “They’re just flooded buildings,” he said. “They can be cleaned up and rebuilt.”

 

 

   Cedar Rapids City Council member  Tom Podzimek added to the city’s discussion of sustainability when it comes to rebuilding from the floods in one area that hit home. For city gardeners, it might not be a popular idea, but a suggestion that has been proposed in the past would be to sell land that has city gardens – presumably the Squaw Creek gardens, as the Ellis area often floods – and allow developers to build private housing there. The tradeoff would be offering leased city gardens in the city’s new green zone, where flooded homes have been bought out and removed. “Why get in a car and drive five miles?” Podzimek asked, when the “greener” model would be having gardens located near the people who use them.

   Other ideas for the green zone have included soccer and baseball fields and dog parks. Podzimek said some residents want those entities in areas not prone to flooding, but he said it makes more sense to have homes and structures built away from flood zones and use the 250 acres or so of new green space for those “flood resilient” projects, such as ball fields.

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Disaster recovery and digging trees

   Marion-based Trees Forever is accepting applications for two programs: “Recover, Replant & Restore,” which funds planting projects for flooded neighborhoods or other disaster-affected areas, and, in partnership with Alliant Energy, “We Dig Your District,” a tree-planting program.  

 

   Here are details on both programs:

 

   Trees Forever is accepting applications for disaster recovery assistance and funding through its Recover, Replant & Restore Program.  The goals of the program are to help neighborhoods and communities plan, implement and fund planting projects that will rebuild hope and community spirit in some of the most devastated areas of Iowa.

 

   Iowa communities that were directly impacted by the storms or floods of 2008 are eligible to apply.  Examples of projects that will be considered include neighborhood tree plantings, park or trail recovery or planting projects, waterway recovery or plantings, school ground plantings, downtown business district landscaping, assessing and caring for storm-damaged trees, etc.

 

   Through the Recover, Replant & Restore program, Trees Forever staff will provide assistance with damage assessment, project planning, plant material selection, planting design, volunteer organizing, and tree care or cleanup projects.  In addition, cash grants of up to $2,000 are available to help purchase trees and other plant materials.

 

   “We recognize that many communities affected by last year’s disasters are still in the basic recovery process,” notes Karen Brook, Trees Forever program manager.  “Our goal right now is to provide whatever assistance we can to communities and neighborhoods… to give them some hope for a brighter, greener future.”

 

   Applications for the first round of assistance from the Recover, Replant & Restore program must be submitted by February 27, 2009.  To apply, interested communities or groups should contact Karen Brook at 800-369-1269 ext. 14 or e-mail kbrook@treesforever.org.  A Trees Forever field coordinator will be assigned to assist each applicant with completing a simple nomination form.  Communities or projects accepted for the program will be announced in early March, 2009.

 

    Trees Forever established the Campaign to Recover, Replant & Restore to raise money to assist communities that were affected by the natural disasters of 2008.  Thanks to a major gift from Van Meter Industrial and others donations from across the state, Trees Forever is now able to start assisting these communities.  Anyone interested in more information about the campaign, or wishing to donate to this fund, can contact Mark Signs at 800-369-1269, extension #20, or log on to www.TreesForever.org

 

 

 

   We Dig Your District

 

   Would you like to see more trees planted in your favorite neighborhood park? Do you know of a school playground, nursing home, non-profit, public library, sports complex, cemetery, or trail that could benefit from a few well-placed trees? If so, let your ideas be known.  Site nominations for the We Dig Your District program in Cedar Rapids are due February 25, 2009.

 

Alliant Energy and Trees Forever are once again offering We Dig Your District, a partnership program to plant trees in each of the five Cedar Rapids City Council Districts to demonstrate how trees improve energy efficiency and contribute to a healthier and more beautiful community. And, we need your help!

 Get into the energy efficiency groove and submit suggestions for the 2009 We Dig Your District tree-planting locations.

 To submit a suggestion, tell us the following in 300 words or less.

1. Your name, address, telephone number and e-mail address (optional)

2. The community location where you would like to see trees planted (The location must be within Alliant Energy’s electric service territory in Cedar Rapids.)

3. Why your location should be selected; what makes it special and how trees would make a difference at this site.  Suggestion(s) must be submitted by February 25, 2009 to receive consideration. Submissions can be made online at www.alliantenergy.com/wedigyourdistrict  or via mail to Alliant Energy, Community Relations, Attn: We Dig Your District, 200 First Street SE, PO Box 351, Cedar Rapids, IA 52406-0351.

 

 

 

Suggestions will be reviewed based on their potential to improve energy efficiency, enhance the environment and meet a community need. The review committee will include representatives from Alliant Energy and Trees Forever, with input from local city council members.

 

Selections will include one site within each of the five Cedar Rapids City Council Districts. Planting sites will be announced in March 2009. The 2008 We Dig Your District planting sites included Arthur Elementary School, Cleveland Elementary School, Regis Middle School, Redmond Park and Wilderness Estates Park. Planting at Ushers Ferry was postponed due to the summer flooding.

 

For more information, contact Karen Brook, Trees Forever field coordinator at 373-0650 ext. 14 or email kbrook@treesforever.org

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