Posts tagged color

Good news/bad news on annuals

The following is from Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith:

 It’s a good news, bad news thing.  Annuals provide long-lasting color throughout the summer. Then they die. 

       Perennials, while often providing dramatic color and impression, also often hold blooms for only a short time.  So, mix annuals with perennials.  Tuck annuals in and around trees and shrubs for a surprise splash of color. Use annuals in a container combining colors and textures.  Try some annuals in your vegetable garden. 

           Plan, plan, plan.  Think about what you’re doing.  Starting small works.  Remember when it’s 110’ in the shade in August, you may not want to be tending to an entire back yard of flowers.  But, make an impact.  Down by the road I have a 1’ x 60’ group of plantings that I never have gotten right.  The perennials keep coming up, but there just isn’t any emotion.  Maybe expanding it with a serpentine arrangement will help.  Annuals will be the option until I decide how I want it to ultimately evolve.  

     Color counts.  Create mood and interest with color.  Cool colors like greens, blues and violets help a small area seem larger and hot spots cooler.  Warm colors, the oranges, reds, and yellows, will warm a location and steal the show.  Go ahead:  combine warm and cool contrasting colors.  Yellow and blue are stunning together; red and green eye catching.  Use your imagination.  If you have a very favorite color, create a monochromatic garden but keep interest by varying textures. 

            Choose the right plants.  Annuals that require deadheading and staking may not be your cup of tea.  Reading the label is critical to know proper care. 

           Annuals require one inch of water each week.  When you can see four leaves on each plant, add mulch.  Mulch impedes weed growth and helps retain moisture.  Compost is a wonderful amendment. 

            Visit your favorite garden center.  Ask lots of questions.  Visit your neighbors’ gardens.  Ask lots of questions.  Dig in the dirt and then enjoy what you’ve created.

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Winter Gardening Fair

Linn County Master Gardener, Becki Lynch, shares the following about the Winter Gardening Fair:

 

Hard to believe we’re already into 2009!  I don’t know about you, but the years seem to be spinning along even faster as I get older – and now we’re almost to February 7, 2009, the day of the Winter Gardening Fair, 2009.

 

As you may already know, the Iowa State University Extension Linn County Master Gardeners sponsor this day of gardening seminars each year, partnering with Kirkwood Community College. 

 

This year we’re offering a full day of four seminars, as well as a keynote presentation for $49.  Lunch is also included.  Simply call our Hortline number (319) 447-0647 to request a brochure, or go to our web site www.extension.iastate.edu/linn to see the full array of seminars and details to register.

 

We’re particularly pleased and looking forward to our keynote and featured speakers, Janet Macunovich and Steven Nikkila.  They are a husband and wife team that are both knowledgeable and entertaining speakers.  Janet will be speaking on how to provide continuous color in your landscape through all four seasons.  She is a true Midwesterner and provides very practical and down-to-earth instructions and tips – at the same time, she is a joy to listen to.  I know she’ll get you excited to start your gardening season with lots of new ideas.

 

Steven is a wonderful photographer, who is also a delight to listen to about ways to improve those garden photographs that are so helpful in recording and planning your garden landscape.  He speaks to all of us amateurs with our digital cameras, as well as those more “professional level” folks.  I’m looking forward to being able to ask some of those questions I have about light and framing.  Why do I always seem to cut off the heads of my most beautiful flowers?  And why isn’t the color the same in the photograph as what I see?

 

I’m sure you’ll enjoy our speakers this year, and I hope to see you at the fair this year.  Next week, we’ll have more on  some of the wonderful local speakers who will be presenting workshops at the fair.  

 

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The gardening itch

The following is from Linn County Master Gardener, Claire Smith:

 

     OH!  I had an itch I couldn’t scratch the other day.  And, it occurred two days in a row! The weather was so beautiful!  I wanted so badly to scratch in the snow and dirt to just take a tiny little peek into the flower beds.  I don’t really know what I expected to find.  But I was so curious.  I strolled around the yard. It was like the second day of my latest diet:  can I resist the urge?!   I did resist though not wanting to disrupt the protection the melting mulch provides.  But, then, lo and behold!  A seed catalog arrived in my mail box.  Now how do the seed companies know when to provide a positive reinforcement that spring is just around the corner!

     January is a perfect time of the year to plan gardens.  Measurements will help determine the number of plants needed.  Check the Iowa State University Extension Service web site for gardening information.    Share photos at your favorite garden center.  Ask lots and lots of questions.  Gardeners are nearly always willing to offer advice and knowledge.    One of the most difficult decisions for me in purchasing new plants is color combinations that will provide attractive contrasts.   I relate to a statement, “nature doesn’t create bad color combinations, we do” in an Iowa State Horticulture and Home Pest News publication entitled “Color for Winter Landscapes throughout the Year”.  The article promotes color and interest in conifers but I found it intriguing in the combinations of colors suggested. 

     An absolute must have for a source for color combinations is the 2009 Iowa State University Extension Service calendar available for $6.00 at the Linn County Office in Marion (or mailed to you for $8.00).  Each month features dramatic photos in a different color for each month with lists of annuals, perennials and woody plant selections in the color of the month. The final two pages share a wealth of design information.  And, the back cover provides numerous Horticulture publications and resource contacts.  It is one of the most informative calendars around. 

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