Posts tagged bloom

Garden Party and more in June

Following are some of the gardening and eco-events in Eastern Iowa in June 2009:

Fri., June 5., 8  p.m., An Evening with Fireflies, Indian Creek Nature Center, 6665 Otis Rd. SE, Cedar Rapids. 1 ½ mile walk on grass-surfaced trails. Members, $3; non-members, $5. Children, $1. See: http://indiancreeknaturecenter.org

Sat., June 6, 4:30 p.m., Prairiewoods Garden Party at Mercy Medical Center’s Hallagan Education Center, 701 10th St. SE, Cedar Rapids. Features local wines and artisan cheeses from Kalona; dinner at 6 p.m., silent and live auctions and music. Cost: $35 each or $250 for table of eight. Call (319) 395-6700.

Mon., June 8 – Sat., June 27, RIVERRenaissance, flood anniversary events. See full schedule at: www.downtowncr.org

Tues.,  June 9 and Thurs.,  June 11, 6 p.m and Sat., June 13,  9:30 a.m., Brucemore in Bloom, 2160 Linden Drive SE. Wander among the unique flowers and plants as the Brucemore garden staff traces the development of the formal garden from conception to the current design. Learn about Mrs. Douglas’ vision of turning Brucemore into a country estate and prominent Prairie Style landscape architect O.C. Simonds’ involvement in the process. Admission: $10/adult and free to Brucemore members. Call (319) 362-7375 for reservations or register online: www.brucemore.org

Thurs., June 11, 9 a.m., Invasive Species Field Day, Wickiup Hill Outdoor Learning Center, 10260 Morris Hills Rd., Toddville. Learn about non-native invasive plants, typically transplants from distant places, that threaten native habitats in Iowa. Free program, lunch provided. Register by noon June 9 at www.LinnCountyParks.com by clicking on the “Events” area or call (319) 892-6450.

Sat., June 13, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Linn County Master Gardener garden walk. Explore five diverse Linn County Master Gardener gardens in Cedar Rapids and Marion. Gardens will include ornamental grasses, conifers, vegetables, perennials, containers, ponds and more. Master Gardeners will be at all of the gardens to answer your horticulture-related questions.  Admission: $5 per Adult; $10 per Family. Start at any of the five gardens. See: www.extension.iastate.edu/linn/news/Garden+Walk.htm

Sat. June 13, 10 a.m., Forever Green Garden Center, 125 Forevergreen Rd., Coralville, free pond and water feature seminar. Call (319) 626-6770 or e-mail:  lucyh@forevergreengrows.com

Sat., June 13, 1 p.m., Wetland dedication and walk, Indian Creek Nature Center. A half-mile walk where the Nature Center and Cargill have restored a forested wetland along the Cedar River. Free. See: http://indiancreeknaturecenter.org

Sat., June 20, 1 p.m.,  Green and Simple: Greens from the Yard, Indian Creek Nature Center. Join director Rich Patterson to learn how to identify and prepare nettles, dandelions, lambsquarter and other plants for food.  Members, $5; non-members, $8; children, $1. See:  http://indiancreeknaturecenter.org

Sat., June 20, 6:30-8 p.m., Summer Solstice Celebration, Prairiewoods, 120 E. Boyson Road, Hiawatha. Show appreciation for your dad and the summer season. Join us for a special Father’s Day/Summer Solstice Celebration. The evening will include poetry, prayer, festivities and end the night with a bonfire and s’mores. Free-will offering. Call (319)395-6700 and see: www.prairiewoods.org

 Sat., June 20- Sat., June 27, Project AWARE, Volunteer River Cleanup on the Cedar River. See: www.iowaprojectaware.com

Sun., June 21, 7-10 p.m., “Nature Rocks – The Concert,” Indian Creek Nature Center, 6665 Otis Rd. SE, Cedar Rapids. A green benefit for the Indian Creek Nature Center and SPT Theatre Company. Featuring Mexican food; chair massages; lessons on recycling and a live music concert by SPT’s Doug Elliott, Gerard Estella, Janelle Lauer, Jane Pini and guest artist Dave Moore. Bring lawn chairs. Tickets are $25 for adults, children 16 and under are free. Call the Nature Center at (319) 362-0664 or pay at the gate. See: www.indiancreeknaturecenter.org

 Tues.,  June 23, 6 p.m., Summer Landscape Hike, Brucemore, 2160 Linden Drive SE, Cedar Rapids. Welcome in summer by joining the Brucemore gardeners on a 90-minute hike that will emphasize the spirit of summer through the sights and sounds of the Brucemore estate. Experience the vivid colors of the formal gardens in full bloom, the lush rose bushes, and the fruits of the orchard while listening to stories of the Brucemore families. Admission is $10.00 per person and $7 per Brucemore member. Registration required. Space is limited, call (319) 362-7375 or register online: www.brucemore.org

Thurs., June 25, 7 p.m., Backyard Composting, Meeting Room A of the Iowa City Public Library, 123 S. Linn St. Learn about converting yard and kitchen waste into valuable soil for your yard and garden. Presented by Risa Dotson Eicke, Master Gardener Intern. Information on ECO Iowa City compost bin subsidy will also be available. ECO Iowa City is a grant-funded initiative to improve environmental sustainability in Iowa City. Call (319) 887-6004.

Sat., June 27, 9 a.m. and 11 a.m., ECO Iowa City Landfill and Compost Facility tour, 3900 Hebl Ave. SW. Learn about how compost is made on a large scale, the environmental benefits of composting as a waste reduction tool and how you can use compost to improve your yard or gardens. Parking is limited. Register by calling the Library Reference Desk at (319)356 -5200, option 5.

Sun., June 28, 2 p.m., Cedar Rapids screening of “Mad City Chickens,” a sometimes serious, sometimes whimsical look at the people who keep urban chickens in their backyards; 79-minute movie followed by discussion, Indian Creek Nature Center, 6665 Otis Rd. SE. Admission by donation. For more info: www.tarazod.com/filmsmadchicks.html

If you know of other events, send an email to: cindy.hadish@gazcomm.com or add a comment below.

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Shower time!

 

 

Aloe vera gets a shower

Aloe vera gets a shower

 Those dear, neglected houseplants, alternately baking and freezing in windows that vacillate between oven and freezer in the winter. Once spring arrives, mine spend Iowa’s warmer months outside, where they grow lush and green. But first they must survive the less than ideal conditions indoors.

 

   Kept out of reach of predatory cats, I don’t pay as much attention to my houseplants as I should in the winter. But just recently I brought them back into better health with a good shower. I’ve tried the bathtub and basement sink methods, but finally found that the best spot to spray the plants is right under their window, in the kitchen sink. Each plant gets a good spray and soaking. I let the water drain from the bottom of the planters before putting them back in place. Usually, I try to give them a shower once a month during the winter months, though I’ve been slacking this year. The process can leave a bit of a mess in the sink and although I’m not usually a bleach person, it comes in handy when thoroughly cleaning the sink afterwards.

 

   Because some of the plants are almost out of sight in their window, had it not been for their shower this month, I would have missed a nice surprise. A  geranium, which my mother entrusted to my care when her home was flooded this summer, had actually bloomed! Perhaps this was the plant’s cry for help, since some flowers bloom when they are stressed, but it was nice to see a bright spot of color on a cold winter’s day. 

Mom's geranium

Mom's geranium

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Indoor spring

  Beverly Whitmore of Cedar Rapids, winner of our composting contest, told of a great way to get tulips to bloom indoors.

 

   Beverly fills a pot about two-thirds full with potting soil, inserts the bulbs so they don’t touch and covers them with potting soil.

She waters once, lets it drain and covers the pot with aluminum foil.

   The next part is key – keeping the pots in a cold, dark place. Beverly has a part of her basement that stays dark and gets cold enough – it needs to freeze –  but an unheated garage might also work. In the spring, plants will pop through the foil.  Carefully remove the foil, water again and keep indoors until they bloom.

 

 

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November need-to-know

Linn County Master Gardener, Susan Long, prepared the following Q & A’s that are frequently asked of Hortline volunteers in November.

                Q:  Can I plant potted mums in my garden now for blooms next year?

                A:  Even though potted garden mums may be deemed “hardy”, they don’t over-winter well in Iowa.  The repeated freezing and thawing may heave the plants out of the ground causing damage or death.  The best protection is to not cut back any of the plant and mulch heavily with clean straw, pine needles, or evergreen branches after several hard freezes (mid to late November).  Leaves tend to mat down and don’t serve as adequate protection.  Spring is a better time to plant mums as they have the summer to establish themselves.

 

                Q:  Is it OK to prune oak trees now?

                A:  Winter (December through February) is the best time to prune oak trees in Iowa.  Pruning oak trees in winter greatly reduces the risk of an oak wilt infection.  Oak wilt is a fungal disease that is lethal to many Oaks.  It can be spread from infected trees to healthy trees by sap-feeding beetles.  Oak wilt infections occur most commonly in spring and early summer.  Pruning oak trees in winter greatly reduces the risk of an oak wilt infection as the beetles and fungal mats are not present at that time of the year.

 

                Q:  How do I get my Christmas cactus to bloom at Christmas?

                A:  Day length and temperature control the flowering of a Christmas cactus. Temperatures shouldn’t be above 70’ in the daytime with nighttime temperatures of 60-65’.   Provide your plants with bright day light, not artificial light, until mid-October.  Move the plant to an unused location after mid-October, giving your plant 14 to 16 hours of continuous darkness each day for at least 3 weeks.  Keep the soil conditions dry, watering every 7-10 days.  They don’t like to be moved, however, once buds set the plant can be moved to another location.  Your plant should start to bloom at Christmas.

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Turtles ‘n toads

As much as I enjoy viewing the red, orange and yellow landscapes of an Iowa autumn, there are fall colors that I enjoy even more.

Turtlehead

Turtlehead

Turtlehead and Japanese anemone are autumn perennials that are pretty in pink. Turtlehead, also known as chelone, is a North American wildflower that grows in  moist shade gardens. They bloom in late summer, but mine is still blooming, now, in October. Japanese anemone also comes in other shades, such as white, but my favorite is the fall-blooming pink variety.

 

 

 

 

 

 
Japanese anemone with bee

Japanese anemone with bee

 

 

Toad lily, a plant with both an awesome name and flowers, is in the orchid/purple color scheme. Also known as tricyrtis, toad lily also grows in moist shade gardens. I’m seeing more varieties offered in garden catalogs. Mine came from the Linn County master gardeners sale a few years ago and is always fun to see blooming when most other perennials have finished for the season.

Toad lily

Toad lily

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Deja vu (but no record)

It was just a week ago that I tried to look at the bright side of our snowy spring (March 28 – Say it isn’t snow!) Once again, looking out at a white lawn this morning, I was hopeful that this late-season snow might hold some meaning.

But apparently, we still haven’t set a record. KCRG-TV9 meteorologist Josh Baynes told me this morning that Cedar Rapids still has more than 2 inches to go to beat the record snow of 62.4 inches that fell in 1959-1960. Last night’s snowfall  officially measured as only a trace, leaving the city at 59.9 inches for the season. Iowa City, which didn’t get any measurable snow yesterday, has even more to go. Their record is 75.3 inches and the city has had 61.1 inches this year.

The daylillies, tulips and other plants that have finally emerged should still be OK, but plants that were about to bloom might have suffered from this latest round of cold.

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Longing for lungwort

mar30143.jpg  Ahh… our first taste of spring finally came, on the last day of March. Our KCRG meteorologist said the last time we reached 64 degrees was Nov. 19. It’s been a long time coming.

By this time last year, I had tulips, hyacinth and this pretty pink-to-blue pulmonaria in bloom. A look at the lungwort this weekend wasn’t as inspiring, as it was still somewhat encased in an icy mass. Still, it’s nice to remember how spring feels and know that it’s finally in reach, despite another spritzing of snowfall today.

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