Talking trees

   Wasn’t much of a tree. Neither showy nor stately. But when two storms in July and August of 2003 took down first one half, then the other, our backyard was forever changed, along with my opinion of the tree’s value.

   Birds lost their habitat and food source. Suddenly, the summer sun scorched its way into our home. Even the squirrels that used to chase each other up its branches seemed perplexed at what to do on the stump that remained.

   I hastily replaced the tree (the variety of which I was never sure) with another, without doing my homework. Not a good move. Suggestions made by the Marion-based Trees Forever in an article in the Thursday, May 22, edition of The Gazette might make better choices for Iowans looking to replace their trees this year.

   In the meantime, if you have any tree stories to share, add your comments here.

  

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1 Response so far »

  1. 1

    Cindy said,

    Rich Patterson, director of the Indian Creek Nature Center, sent along the following message, noting the irony of modern development:

    Interesting that old homes (like mine) were often made in small clearings in wooded areas and the surrounding wild trees grew up and provided shade. Today developers seem to strip off big areas of trees and then follow up by planting a few tiny baby trees … and then name their development after a tree species.


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