Exceeding a gardener’s appetite

This post is from Master Gardener, Claire Smith:

    The old fashioned Pick-Up-Sticks game didn’t thrill my six year old granddaughter. For that matter, neither did picking up sticks in the yard, but it’s so great to be outside with the riding mower and wagon that even picking up sticks isn’t all bad.  Next comes cleaning up the flower beds.  Now I think compost. Compost is so wonderful as soil enrichment.  Did you know that about anything but the kitchen sink can go into a compost bin?  And the “bin” can be anything from a pile on the ground to a garbage can to a commercial container?  We’ll have more on compost in future articles.

    This year, my first goal is to be better organized.  I’m learning to be realistic in how much time I have to devote to gardening because gardening for me is like eating; my eyes always exceed my appetite.

·         To create less labor and more curb appeal, we’ll reshape a right angle corner to a soft angle in one of the beds.  It will be so much easier to ride the mower around a curve than to kneel and pull weeds or use a hand edger.  A border grouping between an old concrete water tank, a water way and a wooden fence where the lawn mower won’t fit will eliminate weed whipping there. 

·         An old rake head, attached to a wall will hold garden tools.           

·         The mower blades—that should have been sharpened last fall will be sharpened this week.

·         While weeding is easiest right after a rain, I’m adding a pair of pliers to my tool box to pull mulberry tree seedlings and other stubborn weeds that grow in my xeriscape.

·         Speaking of weeding, a good recycling use for old newspapers is as mulch. Create overlapping layers six to eight deep (black and white, not colored pages). Cover with a thin layer of mulch (i.e. wood shavings) for weight. You’ll eliminate weeds, conserve moisture, and save so much time watering.  And, as the paper disintegrates, it encourages earthworms who will aerate the soil for you. 

·         While I’m not a real bird aficionado, I like bugs less, so we’ll be adding some birdhouses.  Did you know a wren feeds as many as 500 bugs to her young in ONE AFTERNOON?  And, the many colors and designs will enhance the gardens esthetically as well.

·         Remember you can call the Iowa State University Extension Horticulture Hotline at the Linn County office with any gardening questions at 319-447-0647.  Happy Cleanup! 

                       

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: